Ofatumumab: A New Injectable Drug to Help Multiple Sclerosis Relapses

Ofatumumab: A New Injectable Drug to Help Multiple Sclerosis Relapses – People with Multiple Sclerosis or MS need to live with the disease until their last day on earth. Meaning that right now, there is no cure for this disease and people with MS should regularly get treatment to prevent their conditions from getting worse. The good news is that now there is a drug called Ofatumumab that can help people with MS.
– What Ofatumumab Is
Ofatumumab was first introduced as one of the treatment options for MS on August 5, 2020. The drug was clinically tested for around 1 year and 6 month to 900 patients. The study was conducted to find out the best treatment for MS by comparing 2 drugs, one is ofatumumab and the other is Aubagio.

The results show that ofatumumab is the best way to treat MS. The effectiveness of this drug was approved by the Food and Drug Administration or FDA on 19 August 2020. During this summer in the multi-center clinical trial, around 900 people got ofatumumab.

– How Ofatumumab Works
Ofatumumab is injected using an autoinjector pen and it is administered under the skin or subcutaneously. Meaning that patients can use this drug at home without going to the hospital to get an infusion, like when you play online poker at https://poker678.net at home without going to the real casino. This drug works by specifically targeting the B cells in the body to manage the immune system. The drug works like ocrelizumab, which is one of the treatment options for primary progressive MS.

– Side Effects of Ofatumumab
Although this drug has been approved as one of the treatment options for MS, this drug also has side effects. Common side effects of the drug include cold symptoms, skin rashes, trouble sleeping, swelling, tiredness, vomiting, and nausea.

Ofatumumab: A New Injectable Drug to Help Multiple Sclerosis Relapses

However, during the study, some patients reported getting several side effects that can occur after 24 hours of injection, such as reduced immune system, skin infections, allergic reaction, herpes, lower and upper respiratory infections, and headaches. Although MS is incurable, ofatumumab can help to ease the disease. Patients who participated in the trial this summer showed greater results, including fewer relapses, fewer new inflammation, and slowing disease progression.

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